Author Interview: James Emerson Loyd’s The Great War Won Trilogy

It’s early 1918 and the Great War has exhausted all the parties involved: from the Western Front, where resources are scarce, to the Eastern Front, where Russia has been engulfed in a bloody revolution. Having prevailed in the east, Germany could now try to crush France and Britain before the United States might intervene, or it could declare victory and leave the war to its drained enemies. This is the premise of James Emerson Loyd’s fascinating trilogy of alternate history The Great War Won. A small group of German officers led by General von Treptow risks negotiating across enemy lines with the French and the British in an attempt to influence the leadership into seeking peace in Europe. As the titles of the first and second book suggest (Who Desires Peace… and …Should Prepare for War), the conspiracy fails, paving the way for the American intervention developed in Book Three (A Power of Recognized Superiority). Yet the groundwork has been laid for a different outcome than the one we’re familiar with. Continue reading

Our Borders: What’s in a Name?

Yesterday, the protagonist of my series Our Borders asked me to change his name on this website, for privacy reasons. It seemed like an easy thing to do, just Replace All in each of the ten blog posts I have written so far (including the comments), and I’d be done. An hour’s worth of work on my website—tops. (It took a bit longer than that.) Continue reading

Fact or Fiction? Part 2 (Umberto Eco)

Umberto Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum and the rewriting of history

 

Foucault’s Pendulum at the Musée des Arts et Métiers (Paris)

Foucault’s Pendulum at the Musée des Arts et Métiers (Paris)

Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco is one of my favorite novels. I read it first in high school, in Romanian, and then spent countless hours discussing it with my desk-mate and fellow-bookworm Iuliana. I read the novel again in English during my MFA program at Goddard. I wish I knew more Italian so I could read the book in its native language. Continue reading

Fact or Fiction? Part 1 (Jorge Luis Borges)

My one-month old baby doesn’t leave me much time to write, but she lets me read and reflect, at least once in a while. A few days ago I remembered some research I did during my MFA program regarding fiction writers whose work either altered the real world, or who toyed in their writing with the idea of fiction spilling into reality. Of course, the number of writers on such a list is vast, so in my research I focused only on a few of them that I really liked or hated. Their work, that is. Continue reading

Argo (2012 CE) and Kadesh (1275 BCE)

…and then, with the fury of Baal in his blood and the glory of Amun upon him, Rameses II went out alone on the battlefield in his two-horse chariot. He alone cut down Hittites by the thousands. He slashed limbs and heads. He hurled dead bodies into the waters of the Orontes until the river ran red. King Muwatallis II threw another thousand chariots at him. Rameses routed them all—by himself. Terrified, the Hittite king cowered across the river together with his remaining infantry. The mighty Egyptian pharaoh single-handedly seized his victory in battle. Continue reading